New American Paintings/Blog


Abstract Planking: Jason Middlebrook at Lora Reynolds Gallery by New American Paintings
July 22, 2013, 9:00 am
Filed under: Austin, Review | Tags: , ,

Painting on wood panels is old-school, the most popular way of supporting media until canvas took over in the 16th century. Jason Middlebrook isn’t trying to reinvent the wheel by painting directly onto internally cut trunks from the local mill. But in relocating from Williamsburg to Columbia County in upstate New York seven years ago, the artist began infusing his nature-minded oeuvre with the natural landscape. The Line That Divides Us, Middlebrook’s debut solo exhibition at Lora Reynolds Gallery in Austin, is a distillation of his most recent work: subtle compositions on their own sublime hardwood slabs. — Brian Fee, Austin contributor

NAP_blackbetty
Jason Middlebrook | Black Betty, 2013, Spray paint on cherry, 105 x 18 x 1 1/4 inches. Courtesy the artist and Lora Reynolds Gallery, Austin.  Continue reading


Gallerist at Home: Monique Meloche by New American Paintings

Hip, stylish, and ever-tasteful, Monique Meloche (the founder, owner, and namesake of monique meloche gallery) and her husband live in a contemporary single family home in Ukranian Village, Chicago.  After Meloche and her husband got married and moved into their home, they opened the gallery in that very residence in October of 2000 with an exhibition aptly called “Homewrecker” before opening to the public in 2001.

Rashid Johnson, Thug, 2000, neon and mahogany, 48 x 48 in. Image courtesy of artist and moniquemeloche; Photography by Heidi Norton.

Twelve years later, Meloche is still a tastemaker in the art world and gallery circuit.  Meloche also founded Gallery Weekend Chicago, an annual fall art fair that runs from September 21-23rd this year.  Having started the gallery in her home, Meloche is a perfect candidate for Gallerist at Home, as she is constantly testing and blurring the lines between personal and private — home and gallery. – Ellen C. Caldwell Continue reading



Behind the Scenes: Kristen Dodge by openstudiospress

Kristen Dodge is from Boston (don’t get it twisted), and she’s representing Red Sox fans in a city full of Yankees. After several years in Boston where she served as director of judi rotenberg gallery, which shuttered this summer after 40 years of programming, Dodge has taken her new gallerist reigns to the Lower East Side of New York and is running full gallop in her new space, DODGEgallery.

While in Boston, Dodge created a dynamic program of contemporary artists with rotenberg co-director Abigail Ross, which Nick Capasso, senior curator at the DeCordova, said, “became one of the most important places to see advanced work in Boston”—a goal that she is already hard at work executing in her new home in New York at 15 Rivington Street, just around the corner from the New Museum.

Dodge works hard, she expects artists to be hard-working as well, and—to no surprise—she admits that the work she’s drawn to is rigorous. I spoke with the young New York dealer this week to talk about leaving Boston, why she decided on the Lower East Side, and her plans for her new space. —Evan J. Garza

EJG: You were director at judi rotenberg for a number of years before recently moving to New York and starting your own space, DODGEgallery. How did you end up in New York? And why the Lower East Side?
I worked at the rotenberg gallery with Abigail Ross for 6 years. My first day on the job was one of those moments in life when everything falls into place and you find yourself exactly where you need to be. It was an incredible run, and very hard to sever myself from both the gallery and Abi. When I first told her that I needed to follow my own dream, take the leap, grab life by the balls—however you want to say it—she was immediately supportive and excited for me, or relieved to have me off her tail!

I spent a few months weighing the pros and cons of Boston versus New York, and it became very obvious to me that I would have a more balanced lifestyle in Boston, my home, but that I would find greater opportunity in New York. I decided that if I was going to make this commitment and the number of sacrifices that it entails, and ask our artists to do the same, I needed to position the gallery in New York where there is endless and unparalleled opportunity. So I spent about five months traveling back and forth to New York to set up the business. I had some incredible friends who let me sleep on their couch, and so many friends and family who offered their unwavering support. I’m also incredibly lucky that Patton Hindle was willing to pick up her life in Boston and move to New York to join the gallery.

So why the Lower East Side? This is one of the most exciting gallery hubs in the city—it’s the newest generation of spaces, and continues to grow steadily. I’ve heard that nine new galleries opened in L.E.S. this fall. It’s more renegade than Chelsea is now, there’s a greater opportunity to stand out, and find memorable, unlikely spaces [in which] to open a gallery. Visitors like the sense of discovery that the neighborhood offers too. How fantastic is it to walk past a kitchen supply store and stumble into a contemporary art gallery?

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