New American Paintings/Blog

Must-See Paintings Shows: December by New American Paintings

In the 300+ gallery exhibitions that we previewed for this post, we discovered a number of New American Paintings’ alumni on view in December. Jim Lutes continues to produce a substantial body of work and, once again, demonstrates why he is one of Chicago’s leading painters. And check out Dolphin Gallery’s group exhibition “Push” which features several NAP artists, including a favorite of ours, Michael Krueger. Other shows that stand out: Fernando Mastrangelo at Charest-Weinberg, Byron Kim and James Cohan Gallery, and Cordy Ryman and Eli Ridgway. Enjoy the list! Please check them out and let us know what you think in the comments section after the jump!

Cordy Ryman | Shadow Boxed, acrylic, enamel and graphite on wood, 38 x 33.5 x 3.5 inches

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Absence as Catalyst for Social Change – William Cordova at Saltworks Gallery by New American Paintings
September 28, 2011, 8:52 am
Filed under: Atlanta, Review, Spotlight | Tags: , , , , ,

William Cordova’s (NAP MFA Annual 2003) recent show in Atlanta [Saltworks Gallery; September 16 – October 29, 2011] búscame en el torbellion: but also time itself is a complicated knotwork of imagery that potentially provides a rich discussion. – Read the full review by Atlanta Contributor, Paul Boshears, after the jump.

sin titulo (geronimo II), 2011, reclaimed brown paper bag, aerosol can, feathers, coin wrapper, courtesy of the artist and Saltworks

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Must-See Paintings Show: September by New American Paintings

The art world comes alive again in September, as galleries reopen and collectors return from far flung locations. We reviewed upcoming September exhibitions at more than 400 galleries around the country, and there will be a lot of painting on view.

As is typical, many galleries are bringing out the big guns for the new season – from Agnes Martin at The Pace Gallery in New York to a well structured survey of Bay Area figurative painter, Nathan Oliveira, at John Berggruen Gallery in San Francisco. Among the shows opening by emerging artists, it is hard to ignore the trend towards abstract painting that has swept over the art world.

Kimberly Brooks | Punk History, oil on linen, 40 x 36 inches. Courtesy of Taylor De Cordoba, Los Angeles.

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Must-See Exhibitions: A Summer Guide by openstudiospress

Chris Johanson, Hey There, That’s You, 2011 | Acrylic and latex and mirror on wood, 45 1/2 x 54 inches. Courtesy Altman Siegel, San Francisco.

It’s time to break out the sunscreen and the summer group shows (and there’s no shortage of each). 
Our editorial staff have put together our Summer Must-See list for July and August, our guide to more than 50 of the best contemporary painting exhibitions in the country, including dozens of notable and not-to-be-missed shows by masters like De Kooning and serious emerging talent like Matt Connors, Lesley Vance, Leidy Churchman, Chris Johanson, and more. Also included are our picks for summer shows by artists previously featured in New American Paintings.

From L.A. to Chicago, Houston to New York and back, our guide includes exhibitions in every corner of the country. Images and listings after the jump!

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Site Specific: Environmental Services at Solomon Projects, Atlanta by openstudiospress

Environmental Services Paint Shed Showcase, installation view, Solomon Projects, Atlanta. Photo courtesy Solomon Projects.

Environmental Services is Boston artist Douglas Weathersby‘s art-making practice as well as his handyman company and livelihood. Working with clients, galleries, artists, museums, and collaborators, Weathersby responds to both the project at hand and the site itself, transforming accumulations of dust and detritus into elegant installations.

Paint Shed Showcase, his much-anticipated solo show for Atlanta’s Solomon Projects, finds Weathersby at possibly his most refined, with large acrylic on drop cloth paintings operating as both artifacts of his previous work (the ES Paint Shed for Flux Projects) and bona fide paintings and sculptures. As well, the Solomon space has been transformed by wall murals, photographic logs, vinyl graphics by the artist, and installations of used paint cans. As contemporary practitioners continue to explore the painting as object, Weathersby’s approach is in a league of its own, imbuing remarkable conceptual understandings and context into methods of production, the act of art preparation, and actual art-making.

More after the jump.   —Evan J. Garza, Editor-at-Large

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Must-See Painting Shows: May by openstudiospress

Iva Gueorguieva, I as Bear, 2011 | Acrylic and collage on canvas, 90 x 84 inches. Courtesy Ameringer | McEnery | Yohe, New York.

The sun is out, the air is cool, and the new shows are getting hot. New York Gallery Week is in full swing, and private galleries across the country are giving it all they’ve got before collectors and gallery-goers disappear for the summer. Our editorial staff have put together our monthly Must-See list for the month of May, our guide to more than 50 of the best contemporary painting exhibitions in the country, including 15 shows of artists previously featured in New American Paintings and dozens of notable and not-to-be-missed shows across the USA. From L.A. to Chicago, Houston to New York and back, our guide includes exhibitions in every corner of the country. Images and listings after the jump!

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Selfish Media Archeology: In the Studio with Craig Drennen by openstudiospress

Craig Drennen, Dramatis Personae, 2010 | Oil and alkyd on canvas, 72 x 80 inches. Installation view from Craig Drennen: Timon of Athenssamsøn, Boston.

Currently an artist in residency at the Atlanta Contemporary Art Center, and recently named a Dean at the Skowhegan School of Painting and Sculpture, Craig Drennen has a jocular manner and earnest articulation that made for a cheerful studio visit. For the last several years, Drennen has taken vaguely-familiar staged cultural artifacts (the Supergirl movie from the 1980s, Shakespeare’s most obscure play Timon of Athens, or David Robbins’ Talent) and built challenging hyperreal canvases that invite the audience to reconsider the nature of representation. Our conversation, and more images, after the jump.   —Paul Boshears, Atlanta contributor

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