New American Paintings/Blog


Weekly Recap (Week of March 12) by New American Paintings

Last weekend was fun, with a trip to NYC for the art fairs. That led to quite a few posts summarizing our experiences there. We also had some great interviews throughout the week given to us by contributors Ellen C. Caldwell and Josh Reames. If you missed any of the posts, check them out below!

Early in the week we had posts by our guest photo contributors Lee Gainer and Joshua Field. We invited them to send in what caught their eyes while at the fairs. For Lee’s posts click here and here. To view Joshua’s posts, click here and here. Thanks to both of them for sharing! They’ll each receive a free two-year subscription for their contributions.


Wilmer Wilson IV performance at Conner Contemporary Art, Photo By Lee Gainer

en masse: collaborative drawing project, Photo By Joshua Field

NAP Staffers, Drew and Alexa, were also busy cruising the fairs. We posted photos of their trip here. And don’t forget the Whitney Biennial!


Joanna Malinowska at the Whitney Biennial

Satirical. Sexual? Sensical and non…Gavin Bunner’s (NAP #65 & #97) paintings are flat out funny, farcical, and intelligent.  Growing out of his earlier experimentation with watercolors and humorous juxtapositions, Bunner began creating larger compositions in which he inundates the viewer and field with likely and unlikely pairings from pop-culture and the larger media oversoul: Google. View the entire post by Ellen C. Caldwell here.


Gavin Bunner | Easter Egg Hunt, 44.5in x 30in, 2009

Finally, closing out the week, a great interview by Chicago contributor, Josh Reames. Adam Scott has been making large, super-saturated paintings of deconstructed cartoon-y figures and scenes with a sort of implied narrative. The paintings are made by pouring paint in a controlled way to construct an recognizable image, but with a degree of slippage allowing for a wavy, tripped-out looseness to the it. The new work is much different; no cartoons, a new collage aesthetic, and a nod to a left-brained formalism not formerly prevalent in his paintings…Click here for the full interview.


Adam Scott |
Lustro, 2011, acrylic polymer, mica, silica, and color xerox on canvas
, 61″ x 45″


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1 Comment so far
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Wonderful photos of the event! I especially love the first B/W picture..

Comment by realmeans




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